The Lair of the White Worm

The Lair of the White Worm

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The Lair of the White Worm (also known as The Garden of Evil) is a horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, who also wrote Dracula. It is partly based on the legend of the Lambton Worm. The book was published in 1911 by Rider and Son in the UK, the year before Stokers death, with color illustrations by Pamela Colman Smith. In 1925, it was republished in a highly abridged and rewritten form. Over a hundred pages were removed, the rewritten book having only twenty-eight chapters instead of the original forty. The final eleven chapters were cut down to only five, leading some critics to complain that the ending was abrupt and inconsistent. In 1988, it was adapted into a film by Ken Russell. This is a crazy little story that transported me out of my routine. I like the way Stoker shows warm feelings between the characters then juxtaposes them with an environment of extreme violence and insanity. If not for the repose of normal people in the novella, the strangeness of the story would cause it to fall apart. This is Stokers signature method in Dracula as well. I loved the story and think its the authors second best novel after Dracula. This is a high quality book of the original classic edition. This is a freshly published edition of this culturally important work, which is now, at last, again available to you. Enjoy this classic work. These few paragraphs distill the contents and give you a quick look inside: Salton, during the journey to Southampton, often wondered if his grand-nephew was as much excited as he was at the idea of meeting so near a relation for the first time; and it was with an effort that he controlled himself. ..."I am so glad to find you as you are, my dear boy-just such a young man as I had always hoped for as a son, in the days when I still had such hopes. ...This mans grandfather, also named Edgar-they keep the tradition of the family Christian name-quarrelled with his family and went to live abroad, not keeping up any intercourse, good or bad, with his relatives, although this particular Edgar, as I told you, did visit his family estate, yet his son was born and lived and died abroad, while his grandson, the latest inheritor, was also born and lived abroad till he was over thirty-his present age. ... My old friend, Sir Nathaniel de Salis, who, like myself, is a free-holder near Castra Regis-his estate, Doom Tower, is over the border of Derbyshire, on the Peak-is coming to stay with me for the festivities to welcome Edgar Caswall. ...Moreover, I want you to come with me for an early walk, during which we may notice, whilst the matter is fresh in our minds, the peculiar disposition of this place-not merely your grand-uncles estate, but the lie of the country around it.
Publisher: Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation
ISBN: 9781486148646
9780585009537

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